Lesly Gregory
international flags

Settling into your new apartment involves creating an atmosphere unique to your personality. More simply put, how you decorate matters.

Utilizing uncommon pieces with an international flare can help set your home apart. Certain decorative pieces can also add a little luck and good feeling into your space through their symbolic properties.

Here are just a few ways you can give your apartment some global appeal.

Hang an international statement piece

tapestry

There's nothing like incorporating a big, bold piece of art into your room to draw attention. Using art as a statement piece entices people into the room and serves as a great conversation starter.

Consider hanging a tapestry as a statement piece. Crafted around the world, these pieces add color, texture and pattern to your space. Although often large, tapestries are surprisingly easy to hang.

Use nails or pushpins if the fabric is pretty lightweight and you're OK putting a few holes in your wall. Aligning the nails on the seam of your tapestry will prevent noticeable holes on your piece. If you'd rather avoid holes in your walls, apply Velcro to the back of your tapestry for an alternative solution.

An additional benefit to this international art piece is that it can double as a room separator. If your apartment has more of an open concept, use a tapestry to help define your living space while simultaneously drawing the eye of your visitors.

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Introduce positive energy

windcatcher

Many easy-to-find items symbolize luck and positivity throughout the world. Adding them to your apartment decor helps spread the good vibes. Some options include:

Bamboo

Aligned with Feng shui, this plant spreads good luck and energy when placed on the eastern side of your home according to Chinese culture.

Dreamcatcher

These stunning Native American pieces – believed to keep bad dreams out – add a great pop of design to a guest room. They're also a symbol of protection.

Hamsa

Popular throughout the Middle East and North Africa, the open-palm design of this artistic piece usually contains an eye in the center. The Hamsa is a protective charm that also symbolizes peace. They're available as paintings or a solid piece made out of metal, glass, clay or ceramic materials.

Pysanka

Resembling an Easter egg, this “protective" art piece from Ukraine is decorated with traditional folk designs, written on the egg using beeswax.

Ankh

A popular Egyptian symbol representing eternal life, it's also seen as a lucky charm.

Take on an animal theme

elephant statue

Certain animals have historically held cultural significance around the world. Creating a decorative theme around one of these animals – especially if they're already your favorite – can give your apartment a little something extra.

In India, elephants are placed near doors to give passersby a good dose of luck. They also help protect your home. The waving, Japanese cat, Maneki-Neko, so often found in small Chinatown shops, is believed to bring good fortune. Even frogs have symbolic significance. In Australia, they're thought to enhance abundance and symbolize prosperity in wealth and friendship.

Share your love of travel

travel decor

Letting a little international flavor influence your home decor doesn't necessarily mean using pieces from other countries. Maps of all the places you've been or want to visit can create an artful wall inspired by your personal connection to travel. You can literally take your decor global by showing actual places around the world in addition to the art created there.

Whether displaying international art, getting a little luck from significant objects, or sharing your passion for the world through maps, it's easy to find unique items for your home from around the world.

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About The Author

Lesly Gregory

Lesly Gregory has over 15 years of marketing experience, ranging from community management to blogging to creating marketing collateral for a variety of industries. A graduate of Boston University, Lesly holds a B.S. in Journalism. She currently lives in Atlanta with her husband, two young children, three cats and assorted fish.

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