You might be surprised to learn that Savannah, Georgia has a reputation as one of the most haunted cities in the United States. Savannah has a very illustrious past, including the fact that it served as a major port during both the American Revolution and the Civil War.

With so much rich history, it’s little wonder that the historic structures and streets are teeming with paranormal activity. If you are aren’t scared of spooks, you might want to visit some of Savannah’s most haunted locations. Here are five of the top haunts in the city that are not for the faint of heart.

Hamilton Turner Inn

Shortly after the Civil War, Savannah resident Samuel Pugh Hamilton completed construction on his lavish home. The house quickly became a popular place for the wealthy to party, and was also the very first residence in the city to have electricity.

With so much socializing going on in the house, is it any wonder that the place has become one of the most popular haunted locations in Savannah? This former residence is now a bed and breakfast, and guests often report seeing the image of a ghostly man smoking a cigar, and hearing the sounds of a child’s laughter.

Olde Pink House

If you want to grab a bite to eat in Savannah’s historic district why not check out the Olde Pink House? While dining at this famous restaurant, you might become the victim of a real life ghost prank, as the ghosts that are rumored to frequent the restaurant have gained notoriety for the pranks they enjoy playing on the diners.

The identity of the ghost who has taken up residence in the restaurant remains unknown, but it’s rumored that it may be a person who committed suicide many years ago by hanging in the house’s basement.

Andrew Low House

The Andrew Low House Museum is open to the public, and just might be the perfect way to spend an afternoon, with the chance to learn about the city and perhaps hear the sound of footsteps as one of the museum’s haunts moves from room to room.

Employees of the museum believe that the ghost is the home’s former butler Tom, who spent many years walking the house’s hallways in service to the family that owned it.

Hampton Lillibridge House

A private residence, the Hampton Lillibridge House is located in the east side of the city’s Historic District. While visitors aren’t permitted inside, ghost tour companies often stop in front the house so that people can view the place.

The claim to fame for this haunt is that it’s the only home in the city to have had an exorcism performed on it. You can walk by it and hope to catch a glimpse of something supernatural, but the owners of this private home prefer you don’t knock on the door.

Colonial Park Cemetery

The Colonial Park Cemetery was opened in 1750, and enlarged in 1789. Reputed to be one of the top haunted places in the city, the cemetery is the final resting place of many of Savannah’s famous residents, including Button Gwinnett, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Many ghosts are believed to haunt the cemetery’s grounds. One of the most notorious is that of a disfigured homeless boy, Rene Asche Rondoli, who once called the cemetery home. The boy was believed to have murdered two women, and then left their bodies to be found on the cemetery’s grounds. Townspeople hauled the boy to the swamp and hung him without the benefit of a trial. His ghost is believed to still frequent the cemetery grounds when the sun sets.

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