A report on the state of the apartment industry

The Apartment Guide 2020 Annual Rent Report highlights current trends and price fluctuations that renters may experience in various places across the United States. The report compares rent prices for studio, one-bedroom, two-bedroom and three-bedroom apartments to determine which areas of the country or cities are becoming more expensive or more affordable for renters.

Plus, we analyze a key few takeaways and insights from our findings — such as whether or not markets with the biggest rent increases are also those with the most expensive rent prices and how inventory in the housing market may be impacting vacancy rates and unit prices in the rental market — to educate renters about the trends they will be experiencing when searching for a new place to call home.


Rent Report: Contents

  1. National average rent price trends
  2. Regional average rent price trends
  3. State average rent price trends
  4. Average rent price trends in the top 100 cities
    1. Northeast region
    2. Midwest region
    3. South region
    4. West region
  5. Top cities where rents are increasing
  6. Top cities where rents are decreasing
  7. Key findings and rental insights
  8. Renting in America
  9. Methodology

National average rent price trends

National rent prices increased at a higher rate in 2019 than in 2018 for all unit sizes except studios.

chart showing average rent prices for studio, one-bedroom, two-bedroom and three-bedroom apartments in 2019 and 2018

We noted:

  • Relatively no change (0.4%) in studio apartment pricing, from $1,611.60 in 2018 to $1,617.92 in 2019. The average studio rent increased by 1.8% in 2018.
  • One-bedroom prices increased 3.0% on average, from $1,541.30 in 2018 to $1,586.84 in 2019. That’s higher than the 1.6% increase we saw in 2018.
  • There was a 1.7% increase in two-bedroom prices, from $1,779.26 in 2018 to $1,808.73 in 2019. Two-bedroom rental prices were relatively flat in 2018, increasing by only 0.2% ($4 total) on average throughout the year.
  • A slightly lower increase of 1.2% on average in three-bedroom prices, from $1,928.74 in 2018 to $1,951.14 in 2019. In the previous year, three-bedroom prices actually decreased by 1.8%.

An interesting takeaway here is that the average studio unit is more expensive nationally than the average one-bedroom apartment.

Regional average rent price trends

The U.S. Census Bureau breaks the country into four distinct regions (Northeast, Midwest, South and West). Here are the rent price trends in each region.

When digging into each region, we noticed a few interesting trends begin to take shape:

  • Prices for smaller units are increasing the most in the West (3.4% for studios and 3.5% for one-bedrooms)
  • In the South and Northeast, one-bedroom unit costs are growing at nearly the same rate (2.9% and 2.4%, respectively)
  • The cost of a two-bedroom unit is rising fastest in the South (2.4%), followed by the West (1.2%)
  • Three-bedroom units in the West have the steepest price growth seen this year (4.7%)
  • The West is the only region showing across-the-board growth in rent prices with no decreases
  • In the Midwest, the larger the unit, the lower the cost threshold (2.7% increase for studios, 1.6% for one-bedrooms, 0.5% for two-bedrooms and -2.7% for three-bedrooms). It is the only region to reflect this trend.
  • Three decreases were noted at the regional level: Studio apartments in the South (-0.9%) and Northeast (-3.3%), as well as three-bedroom units in the Midwest (-2.7%)

State average rent price trends

Narrowing in on a more local view, here’s a look at the changes we observed state-by-state.

When comparing different states and different unit sizes, we noticed that one-bedroom units saw the largest number of states with rent price increases:

  • Average studio rent prices increased in 25 states (including Washington, D.C.) and decreased or stayed the same in 23 states. Three states had insufficient studio inventory.
  • Average one-bedroom rent prices increased in 29 states (including Washington, D.C.) and decreased in 22 states
  • Average two-bedroom rent prices increased in 25 states and decreased in 26 states (including Washington, D.C.)

Top 10 states for one-bedroom rent increases

These states have seen average one-bedroom apartment prices increase the most in 2019:

RankState2019 Average 1-BR RentAverage 1-BR Price Increase
1Delaware$1,311.3145.9%
2Montana$1,280.8034.5%
3Maine$1,469.8323.9%
4West Virginia$1,124.4218.4%
5Michigan$1,095.1115.6%
6Arizona$1,238.5614.7%
7Massachusetts$2,552.0413.7%
8Florida$1,630.3411.1%
9North Dakota$866.1910.6%
10South Dakota$757.778.8% 

Top 10 states for one-bedroom rent decreases

These states have seen average one-bedroom rent prices fall the most in 2019:

RankState2019 Average 1-BR RentAverage 1-BR Price Decrease
1Arkansas$683.46-13.0%
2Iowa$847.55-11.9%
3Alaska$710.56-10.5%
4New Mexico$818.43-6.6%
5Oklahoma$756.69-6.3%
6New York$2,068.26-6.1%
7Connecticut$1,719.16-5.7%
8Hawaii$2,156.70-5.0%
9Tennessee$1,237.69-4.5%
10Virginia$1,715.06-4.3% 

Here are some additional trends we spotted for one-bedroom average rent prices by state:

Average rent price trends in the top 100 cities

We were able to identify rent trends for more than 90 percent of the 100 most populated cities in the U.S., based on sufficient inventory. Complete data for these cities can be found in our methodology.

heat map showing average one-bedroom rent price increases and decreases in the 100 largest cities in America

National overall rent price increases in the most populated cities:

  • 33 cities show across-the-board rent increases in studio, one- and two-bedroom units. Of those, 48% are in the South, 30% are in the West, 15% are in the Midwest and 6% are in the Northeast.
  • In contrast, no city had an across-the-board decrease in studio, one- and two-bedroom units

National studio rent price increases in the most populated cities:

  • 61% of cities reflected an increase in studio prices
  • 39% of cities reflected a decrease in studio prices

National one-bedroom rent price increases in the most populated cities:

  • 64% of cities reflected an increase in one-bedroom prices
  • 36% of cities reflected a decrease in one-bedroom prices

National two-bedroom rent price increases in the most populated cities:

  • 62% of cities reflected an increase in two-bedroom prices
  • 38% of cities reflected a decrease in two-bedroom prices

One-bedroom rents are increasing in 16 of the top 25 U.S. markets by population, with most of the movement in the South (eight cities) and West (six cities), followed by the Midwest (two cities).

In contrast, one-bedroom rents are decreasing in nine of the top 25 U.S. markets by population, broken up fairly evenly by region with three in the Northeast and two in each of the South, Midwest and West.

Newark, NJ now tops the list of cities where rent is increasing the most for the second year in a row, with some increases that far exceed those seen in any other city. Studio prices in Newark increased by 44.8 percent and one-bedroom prices increased by 42.8 percent.

Northeast region

new york

Out of all of the cities among the 100 most populated with sufficient inventory in each unit size group in the Northeast region, 50 percent of cities experienced an increase in average studio prices, 57 percent saw an increase in one-bedroom prices and 28 percent had an increase in two-bedroom average prices.

What follows is a more granular view of the year-over-year rent changes in this part of the country.

Studio apartments

One city experienced a studio rent increase of 10 percent or more:

No city experienced a studio rent decrease of 10 percent or more.

One-bedroom apartments

One city experienced a one-bedroom rent increase of 10 percent or more:

No city experienced a one-bedroom rent decrease of 10 percent or more.

Two-bedroom apartments

One city experienced a two-bedroom rent increase of 10 percent or more:

Two cities experienced a two-bedroom rent decrease of 10 percent or more:

Midwest region

chicago

Out of all of the cities among the 100 most populated with sufficient inventory in each unit size group in the Midwest region, 50 percent of cities experienced an increase in average studio prices, 53 percent saw an increase in one-bedroom prices and 70 percent had an increase in two-bedroom average prices.

What follows is a more granular view of the year-over-year rent changes in this part of the country.

Studio apartments

Two cities experienced a studio rent increase of 10 percent or more:

Two cities experienced a studio rent decrease of 10 percent or more:

One-bedroom apartments

Three cities experienced a one-bedroom rent increase of 10 percent or more:

Two cities experienced a one-bedroom rent decrease of 10 percent or more:

Two-bedroom apartments

Five cities experienced a two-bedroom rent increase of 10 percent or more:

One city experienced a two-bedroom rent decrease of 10 percent or more:

South region

atlanta

Out of all of the cities among the 100 most populated with sufficient inventory in each unit size group in the South region, 61 percent of cities experienced an increase in average studio prices, 64 percent saw an increase in one-bedroom prices and 53 percent had an increase in two-bedroom average prices.

What follows is a more granular view of the year-over-year rent changes in this part of the country.

Studio apartments

Six cities experienced a studio rent increase of 10 percent or more:

Three cities experienced a studio rent decrease of 10 percent or more:

One-bedroom apartments

Five cities experienced a one-bedroom rent increase of 10 percent or more:

Four cities experienced a one-bedroom rent decrease of 10 percent or more:

Two-bedroom apartments

Six cities experienced a two-bedroom rent increase of 10 percent or more:

Four cities experienced a two-bedroom rent decrease of 10 percent or more:

West region

san francisco

Out of all of the cities among the 100 most populated with sufficient inventory in each unit size group in the West region, 56 percent of cities experienced an increase in average studio prices, 72 percent saw an increase in one-bedroom prices and 73 percent had an increase in two-bedroom average prices.

What follows is a more granular view of the year-over-year rent changes in this part of the country.

Studio apartments

Three cities experienced a studio rent increase of 10 percent or more:

One city experienced a studio rent decrease of 10 percent or more:

One-bedroom apartments

Three cities experienced a one-bedroom rent increase of 10 percent or more:

No city in this region experienced a one-bedroom rent decrease of 10 percent or more

Two-bedroom apartments

Thirteen cities experienced a two-bedroom rent increase of 10 percent or more, highlighted by five with increases over 15 percent:

One city experienced a two-bedroom rent decrease of 10 percent or more:

Top 10 cities where rents on one-bedroom apartments rose in 2019

Newark, NJ tops the list of communities where rents rose on one-bedroom apartments in 2019. Here’s a look at the top 10 cities experiencing rent increases, as well as their cost of living changes over the past year. 

infographic showing 10 cities where one-bedroom rent increased the most in 2019

Top 10 cities where rents on one-bedroom apartments fell in 2019

Virginia Beach, VA tops the list of communities where rents fell on one-bedroom apartments in 2019. Here’s a look at the top 10 cities experiencing rent decreases, as well as their cost of living changes over the past year.

infographic showing 10 cities where one-bedroom rent decreased the most in 2019

Key findings and rental insights

1. Historic supply limitations in the housing market appear to be impacting vacancy rates, and thus prices, in the rental market.

According to Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies, new housing construction has barely kept pace with the growth in housing demand over the past decade, particularly in western states. From 2010 – 2018, annual construction nearly equaled year-to-year household growth; 8.35 million new households were formed, and 8.35 million new housing units were built, including housing completions and manufactured home placements. This equates to a pace of 100 housing units added for every 100 households — essentially a severe shortage in new housing, since the industry’s typical build rate since 1970 has been 130 new units for every 100 households formed.

Although this ratio is a rule-of-thumb for the housing industry and does not explain every trend seen, there’s still reason to speculate that the lower-than-usual build rate for new housing could inherently be placing pressure on the rental market. In the West, for example, a look at issued housing permits from 2007 to 2017 shows the most constraint in western states — which is also where we’ve noted the largest and most universal increases in rent prices across unit size. In contrast, in some cities where new housing construction was robust relative to household growth, we noted a decrease in baseline rents (New York: 182 permits per 100 households added and a 6.0 percent decrease in one-bedroom rent prices, St. Louis, MO: 217 permits per 100 households added and a 3.3 percent decrease in one-bedroom rent prices and Richmond, VA: 173 permits per 100 households added and a 2.9 percent decrease in one-bedroom rent prices).

Between 2007 and 2017, other major U.S. markets experienced vacancy rates well below the average for their sizes — such as San Francisco, San Diego and Boston. However, we noted decreases in one-bedroom apartment prices in these cities, indicating that undersupply may now be starting to loosen its grip on these markets.

Early indications from an upcoming study of the rentals market reveal that rental markets across the U.S. are extremely tight. Vacancy rates sit at decades-long lows, according to the organization, and the number of cost-burdened renters is on the rise, meaning that people are finding it harder to afford rent. The Center’s 2019 report on housing indicates that supply of rentals closely matched demand in the South and West regions, which may help explain the pervasive rent increases we’ve noted in those parts of the country. In contrast, demand in the first part of last year moderately exceeded new supply in the Northeast and Midwest regions.

As renters struggle, local governments are on the front line. Some action is underway, such as the recent move that Minneapolis made to become the first large American city to end single-family zoning and work toward greater housing availability and affordability.

2. Average studio rent prices are more expensive than the average one-bedroom rent prices.

Although construction in the housing industry has struggled to keep up with demand, construction in the rental industry has been booming. Rental completions reached a 30-year high in 2018 with 360,000 added units. According to the Joint Center for Housing Studies, higher-income households have played a role in this build rate. Even with an adjustment made for inflation, the number of renters earning at least $75,000 has increased for at least eight consecutive years. Twenty-five percent of renter households are now in this income bracket, up 19 percent over the past decade or so.

Although the largest share of renters come from households helmed by someone under age 35, households headed by someone 55 and older now make up more than a quarter of renter households, a number that appears to be on the rise — and this could potentially help account for the growing number of higher-income households overall.

There are some indications that as renter incomes (and ages, perhaps) rise, demand for new apartments and amenities are rising as well. Rents for professionally managed apartments were up more than 3 percent in more than half of the 150 metros tracked by RealPage, and growth even exceeded 5 percent in 25 of those markets.

Overall, demand in the rental market — especially from older and higher-income renters — is likely to drive prices up and push renters toward a lower point-of-entry. In 2019, studio rent prices outpaced any other unit type, which could indicate that renters were increasingly interested in the smallest and typically most affordable unit size.

At the local level, 20 of the 100 most populated U.S. cities show higher rents for studio apartments than one-bedroom units. Of these cities, 65 percent are in the South, 20 percent are in the West and 15 percent are in the Midwest. The Northeast is noticeably absent from this trend, perhaps in part due to the housing market’s more robust build rate, and thus home buying options, in this region.

3. The largest rent increases are not necessarily correlated with the highest rent prices.

At both the state and city level, many of the markets with rising rents were not those with the highest rent prices.

For example, among the top 10 states with the highest one-bedroom rent prices, modest increases or, in some cases, decreases were seen in rent prices in California (+2%), New York (-6%) and Illinois (-1%).

Along the same lines, the three cities with the highest average one-bedroom rent prices in 2019 (New York, San Francisco and Boston) saw rent prices decrease by 6 percent, 1 percent and nearly 9 percent, respectively. This trend continues with larger units. Seven of the top 10 most expensive markets showed decreases in two-bedroom units: New York (-14%), San Francisco (-11%), Boston (-2%), San Jose (-2%), Los Angeles (-2%), Jersey City, NJ (-2%) and Washington, D.C. (-1%).

Since we are seeing national average rents increase while rents in these notoriously expensive cities decrease, we can conclude a good portion of these national increases are coming from smaller cities and towns across the country.

4. Rent increases or decreases are not necessarily reflective of trends in an entire metro area.

In some metros, apartment living is getting more expensive at the same time that it is getting less expensive in neighboring cities — making it possible that a minor relocation could potentially have a meaningful impact on how much you will pay to live.

For example:

Renting in America

Apartment Guide aims to understand how people feel about what they’re paying for rent, so we surveyed roughly 700 people across the country. We asked for details about their current living situation, as well as their overall satisfaction level with the arrangement and its impact on their finances. Here’s what they shared with us:

infographic showing what renters think about rent prices

According to our survey, roughly 4 in 10 apartment renters (43%) that rent is too high. However, nearly an identical number of people (42%) say they are satisfied with their living situation.

Unsurprisingly, people who have a higher monthly rent are more likely to feel their rent payments are too high. Sixty-seven percent of people paying more than $2,000 a month agree with this statement, while only 33 percent of people paying less than $1,100 a month agree. However, people making between $50,000 and $100,000 annually are more likely to think their rent payments are too high compared to renters making more than $100,000 or renters making less than $50,000 a year.

Overall satisfaction is somewhat correlated to the amount of money renters make or the amount they need to pay for their monthly rent. The groups most satisfied with their living situation are making more than $100,000 per year or are paying less than $1,100 a month for rent.

Finally, while the majority (75%) of renters say they want to be a homeowner, only about 30 percent say their next move will involve a home purchase.

Advice for renters

We all want to live more comfortably, especially as rent prices continue to increase. Here are a few suggestions for renters:

  • Make a list of needs vs. wants and choose a neighborhood and property based on needs first. Allow yourself a stable financial foundation to work from with the knowledge that creature comforts come in many forms and can be added to your life as your budget allows.
  • Look for levers. If your neighborhood and property allow you easy access to public transportation, then you know you’ll have a key cost-saving measure available if you need it. Similarly, if your property has an on-site gym or your desired apartment has ample storage space, you know you won’t need to budget for those expenses. The balance of amenities that you’re able to establish will allow you choices about how to spend your money, beyond rent.
  • Do your homework. Research what’s on the market before and during your search, and know what typical rent prices and amenities are in your desired neighborhood and price range. Remember to ask each property you visit for the average cost of utilities per unit type and if there are charges for amenities like on-site parking, additional storage, access tools such as fobs, pest control and trash valet. Find out if the property you’re interested in has negotiated deals with the local cable and internet provider, and ask whether neighborhood merchants offer residents any deals or perks as well.
  • Remember that value is a constantly shifting baseline. Rent prices can go up and down based on demand and supply, as well as other variables. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, demonstrate your knowledge, and ask for a better price or an extra amenity here and there (accent walls and appliance upgrades are common requests).
  • Remember, timing matters. There’s a reason that people tend to buy cars and televisions on certain days of the year, and the same rule applies to looking for a new home. Rents can be lower in the fall and winter months and higher in summer months as people relocate for school zoning needs and job-related reasons. Understand the ways in which seasonality can impact your search, and be as flexible as you can about your desired move-in date.
  • Partner up. A roommate can be more than just good company. Consider the benefits of sharing the cost of rent, utilities and perhaps an on-site storage locker and cost club membership.
  • Live on a middle floor. You might want the convenience of a first-floor unit or the views and quiet that come with a top floor, but did you know you can actually save money on rent, as well as your heating and cooling bills, by living on a middle floor? When you have other units surrounding yours, you can benefit from some of the heat or air conditioning that your neighbors are using. This means you might be able to run your heating and cooling units less, saving on your electric or gas bill.

Methodology

To determine our average rent prices, we took data from Apartment Guide and Rent.com’s multifamily rental property inventory from the first week in each month in a given calendar year and averaged those prices together to find an annual average for that year. We used a weighted average formula that more accurately represents price availability for each individual unit type. This specific methodology was used because it provides a better overall average for the year as a whole and reduces the influence of seasonality on rent prices in specific markets.

The U.S. Census divides the country into four geographic regions: Northeast (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont); Midwest (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin); South (Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, District of Columbia and West Virginia) and West (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Hawaii, Utah, Washington and Wyoming).

The top 100 cities are determined by 2018 U.S. Census Bureau population estimates. We excluded cities with less than 50 average available studio units and 200 average available one- or two-bedroom units in 2019 to eliminate potential outliers or highly volatile data caused by a small sample size. Rent price increases and decreases are based on the percentage change of apartment rental prices from 2019 to 2018.

Here are the full rental data among the top 100 most populated cities:

Rank by PopulationCity, StatePopulation2019 Studio Avg Rent1-Year Change: Studio2019 1-BR Avg Rent1-Year Change: 1BR2019 2-BR Avg Rent1-Year Change: 2-BR
1New York, NY8,398,748$3,335.60-7.3%$4,108.99-6.0%$5,371.29-14.1%
2Los Angeles, CA3,990,456$2,625.728.3%$3,304.664.8%$4,825.84-1.6%
3Chicago, IL2,705,994$1,903.247.5%$2,359.164.8%$3,239.772.9%
4Houston, TX2,325,502$1,305.44-15.5%$1,281.60-7.5%$1,709.09-9.9%
5Phoenix, AZ1,660,272$1,172.1727.3%$1,342.3121.2%$1,616.4127.7%
6Philadelphia, PA1,584,138$1,705.83-6.6%$2,073.49-2.6%$2,919.81-3.7%
7San Antonio, TX1,532,233$1,197.6516.7%$1,143.283.8%$1,416.421.8%
8San Diego, CA1,425,976$2,292.09-2.6%$2,529.24-2.3%$3,276.872.6%
9Dallas, TX1,345,047$1,312.337.6%$1,494.857.6%$2,043.305.4%
10San Jose, CA1,030,119$2,669.712.5%$3,118.250.9%$3,685.59-1.6%
11Austin, TX964,254$1,345.51-0.1%$1,472.702.1%$1,838.660.3%
12Jacksonville, FL903,889$926.810.8%$1,177.356.6%$1,351.523.6%
13Fort Worth, TX895,008$1,279.1411.3%$1,323.248.4%$1,645.942.0%
14Columbus, OH892,533$1,087.07-1.8%$1,015.74-7.1%$1,267.40-3.1%
15San Francisco, CA883,305$3,841.97-8.2%$4,062.18-1.2%$5,478.28-11.2%
16Charlotte, NC872,498$1,347.78-6.5%$1,376.50-0.7%$1,624.70-4.7%
17Indianapolis, IN867,125$1,101.40-12.0%$1,090.56-3.0%$1,248.663.0%
18Seattle, WA744,955$1,687.04-5.8%$2,578.838.5%$4,109.8511.2%
19Denver, CO716,492$1,687.520.5%$1,951.031.6%$2,758.80-5.1%
20Washington, DC702,455$2,120.555.2%$2,762.936.7%$3,755.79-1.0%
21Boston, MA694,583$3,061.43-8.8%$3,712.96-8.7%$5,354.21-2.1%
22El Paso, TX682,669$554.074.3%$862.2419.6%$1,011.5411.5%
23Detroit, MI672,662$1,242.4131.8%$1,607.1013.2%$2,049.649.1%
24Nashville, TN669,053$1,642.545.5%$1,698.530.3%$2,126.701.9%
25Portland, OR653,115$1,670.931.9%$1,939.863.3%$2,508.11-0.9%
26Memphis, TN650,618$994.84-5.8%$901.00-5.3%$1,018.29-7.8%
27Oklahoma City, OK649,021$788.0022.1%$880.86-1.0%$1,039.59-10.4%
28Las Vegas, NV644,644$669.57-14.1%$1,058.395.6%$1,238.342.4%
29Louisville, KY620,118$1,035.821.1%$1,158.852.1%$1,295.49-2.0%
30Baltimore, MD602,495$1,439.77-8.0%$1,732.856.8%$1,899.011.8%
31Milwaukee, WI592,025$1,334.365.6%$1,412.2514.9%$1,482.054.8%
32Albuquerque, NM560,218$622.40-4.9%$815.39-7.5%$962.15-8.5%
33Tucson, AZ545,975$636.26-3.2%$791.992.7%$998.220.0%
34Fresno, CA530,093N/AN/AN/AN/A$1,395.319.9%
35Mesa, AZ508,958$860.672.3%$1,039.037.4%$1,305.9514.6%
36Sacramento, CA508,529$1,831.20-2.7%$1,643.020.8%$1,890.90-0.9%
37Atlanta, GA498,044$1,720.72-0.9%$1,711.87-0.1%$2,235.38-1.6%
38Kansas City, MO491,918$1,131.1613.4%$1,297.3811.3%$1,570.1516.9%
39Colorado Springs, CO472,688N/AN/A$1,224.301.8%$1,485.152.1%
40Miami, FL470,914$1,862.764.4%$2,597.5721.7%$2,854.6218.1%
41Raleigh, NC469,298$1,272.46-8.9%$1,193.19-4.0%$1,397.73-5.7%
42Omaha, NE468,262$789.883.7%$937.32-1.6%$1,198.95-2.0%
43Long Beach, CA467,354$2,276.8713.6%$2,666.4314.0%$3,688.3114.2%
44Virginia Beach, VA450,189$1,279.39-12.6%$1,165.64-26.8%$1,314.82-11.5%
45Oakland, CA429,082$2,838.543.3%$3,308.290.7%$4,338.146.0%
46Minneapolis, MN425,403$1,266.20-0.4%$1,544.22-2.1%$2,237.152.7%
47Tulsa, OK400,669N/AN/A$669.96-8.2%$893.182.0%
48Arlington, TX398,112N/AN/A$1,000.02-13.5%$1,408.18-12.1%
49Tampa, FL392,890$1,550.5313.4%$1,540.948.9%$1,899.6912.0%
50New Orleans, LA391,006$1,259.12-5.8%$1,564.84-14.4%$2,110.70-28.8%
51Wichita, KS389,255N/AN/A$804.46-14.9%$866.91-6.5%
52Cleveland, OH383,793$1,041.59-1.3%$1,475.401.7%$2,168.3415.5%
53Bakersfield, CA383,579N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
54Aurora, CO374,114$1,420.27-2.0%$1,509.191.6%$1,778.011.5%
55Anaheim, CA352,005$1,859.158.9%$2,151.1611.8%$2,608.4210.7%
56Honolulu, HI347,397N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
57Santa Ana, CA332,725$1,657.586.3%$1,955.091.2%$2,540.3112.5%
58Riverside, CA330,063$1,447.728.5%$1,690.637.2%$2,093.1115.2%
59Corpus Christi, TX326,554$982.245.5%$961.883.2%$1,217.677.1%
60Lexington, KY323,780$756.4722.0%$911.074.0%$1,158.798.6%
61Stockton, CA311,178N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
62Henderson, NV310,390N/AN/A$1,375.2916.9%$1,552.4210.3%
63St. Paul, MN307,695$1,313.925.8%$1,477.643.2%$1,993.076.6%
64St. Louis, MO302,838$1,044.16-5.4%$1,293.24-3.3%$1,467.6811.3%
65Cincinnati, OH302,605$950.50-10.7%$1,130.164.8%$1,398.3315.7%
66Pittsburgh, PA301,048$1,378.412.8%$1,623.906.0%$1,980.750.7%
67Greensboro, NC294,722$631.247.1%$860.401.8%$892.4421.7%
68Anchorage, AK291,538N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
69Plano, TX288,061$1,422.501.3%$1,443.537.8%$1,955.7210.4%
70Lincoln, NE287,401$826.90-5.0%$946.310.3%$1,103.58-1.3%
71Orlando, FL285,713$1,532.861.3%$1,528.2910.0%$1,867.9210.5%
72Irvine, CA282,572$2,508.292.9%$2,657.973.4%$3,241.191.5%
73Newark, NJ282,090$1,928.0644.8%$2,305.0942.8%$2,773.6127.4%
74Toledo, OH274,975N/AN/A$821.75-8.7%$976.562.4%
75Durham, NC274,291$1,396.423.1%$1,250.464.9%$1,451.650.8%
76Chula Vista, CA271,651N/AN/A$2,108.203.4%$2,703.9912.9%
77Fort Wayne, IN267,633N/AN/A$749.749.1%$988.7814.7%
78Jersey City, NJ265,549$2,599.064.8%$3,006.421.9%$4,107.20-2.2%
79St. Petersburg, FL265,098$1,707.1028.5%$1,545.8519.9%$1,923.5619.5%
80Laredo, TX261,639N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
81Madison, WI258,054$970.226.9%$1,215.46-10.1%$1,525.36-20.2%
82Chandler, AZ257,165N/AN/A$1,417.1517.8%$1,701.8916.3%
83Buffalo, NY256,304N/AN/A$1,014.563.2%$1,453.09-14.3%
84Lubbock, TX255,885N/AN/A$707.66-9.0%$898.31-6.0%
85Scottsdale, AZ255,310N/AN/A$1,735.089.0%$2,502.3130.7%
86Reno, NV250,998$905.3121.8%$1,394.00-0.4%$1,647.554.4%
87Glendale, AZ250,702N/AN/A$1,095.026.5%$1,516.8823.0%
88Gilbert, AZ248,279N/AN/A$1,098.68-4.5%$1,323.25-6.7%
89Winston-Salem, NC246,328N/AN/A$888.804.7%$918.80-2.7%
90North Las Vegas, NV245,949N/AN/A$909.19-0.7%$1,080.010.5%
91Norfolk, VA244,076$1,141.512.2%$1,308.590.8%$1,492.083.6%
92Chesapeake, VA242,634N/AN/A$1,375.8912.3%$1,383.60-3.1%
93Garland, TX242,507N/AN/A$1,070.79-13.9%$1,570.53-5.6%
94Irving, TX242,242$1,404.589.0%$1,355.677.2%$1,690.834.6%
95Hialeah, FL238,942N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
96Fremont, CA237,807N/AN/A$2,370.25-5.9%$3,088.332.1%
97Boise, ID228,790N/AN/A$1,256.48-0.4%$1,488.65-1.8%
98Richmond, VA228,783$1,050.763.3%$1,096.13-2.9%$1,274.00-4.4%
99Baton Rouge, LA221,599$1,013.29-27.4%$1,042.58-6.0%$1,214.48-6.2%
100Spokane, WA219,190N/AN/AN/AN/A$1,303.511.2%

Cost of living data displayed in the top cities for rent increases and decreases is sourced from Cost of Living Index comparisons from Q3 2019 to Q3 2018 as compiled by the Council for Community and Economic Research. El Paso, TX was not included in this comparison due to a lack of data from Q3 2018 for this market.

Findings in the renter survey are based on responses from 680 renters across the country. The population was 55 percent female and 45 percent male. The majority of respondents earned less than $75,000 a year.

This report includes information from the following third-party sources:

  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Council for Community and Economic Research
  • Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University
  • RealPage
  • New York Times

The rent information included in this article is based on multifamily rental property inventory on Apartment Guide and Rent.com and is used for illustrative purposes only. The data contained herein do not constitute financial advice or a pricing guarantee for any apartment.

Editorial credit for photo of Arlington, TX: Frank Romeo / Shutterstock.com

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